Happy 25th Anniversary of Reunification, Lithuania!

 

Credit: LTUWorld

Credit: LTUWorld

On this day 25 years ago, the Baltic Republic of Lithuania broke away from the Soviet Union. (It was the first Baltic to do so.)

Here’s more about this important historical event from LTUWorld:


Lithuania marks the 25-year anniversary of the restoration of its independence.

We Believe in Freedom. We always did. For centuries from the beginning of Lithuanian statehood to the present day.

Having restored Lithuania’s independence 25 years ago two out of three Lithuanians personally remember that thirst for freedom and how comforting the first gulps were. We remember how good it felt to return to Europe, to be back home where freedom is an underlying value.

11th March 1990 was the day when Lithuanians became free to choose, to grow, to be themselves. And we try to do our best.

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If you are interested in how the world press reacted to the restoration of Lithuania’s Independence in 1990, check out this source: http://parodos.lnb.lt/en/exhibits/show/paroda-kovo-11

Grateful to have immediate roots in a country that prizes faith, freedom, and free markets.

Happy Reunification Day, Lietuva!

Lithuanian Independence Day: Learning to Cherish Freedom Through the Eyes of Others

February 16 marks 95 years since Lithuania gained her independence.

You might be asking yourselves, “what is Lithuania? Is it a made-up country?” Despite boasting an exotic name, Lithuania is a real country with a rich history.

From February 16, 1918, until August 23, 1939, Lithuania enjoyed freedom and prosperity until the Soviet Union grabbed hold of it through the so-called German-Soviet Non-Aggression Pact (Molotov-Robbentrop Act). From 1939 until March 11, 1990 (reunification), Lithuania was subjected to endless bloodshed, tyranny, and death under Lenin, Stalin, and other brutal dictators. Religious and/or ethnic persecution of Jews, Catholics, Christians, Lithuanians, Russians, Poles, and those who didn’t agree with Soviet communism was witnessed. The horror exhibited under Soviet occupation is inexcusable and should be rightly condemned. (I would know – my family personally suffered.) Nevertheless, it’s important to remember that many Lithuanians craved freedom and were determined to depose the Soviet Union.

Regarded as the land of “beer, babes, and basketball” to tourists, Lietuva (Lithuanian for “rainy country”) is an untapped treasure in Eastern Europe. Castles, sandy beaches, forests prime for mushroom hunting, and amber jewelry are yet to be discovered by most.

Vilnius, capital of Lithuania

Lithuanian amber

Svyturys, Lithuanian beer

If you’re looking for a unique place to visit this year, make Lithuania your top 2013 destination. Just don’t plan to bring a mail-order bride back with you.

Hill of Witches  – Juodkrantė

yewtreenights.blogspot.com

Hill of Crosses – Siauliai

sacredsites.com

Palanga Amber Museum – Palanga

(pgm.lt)

Gediminas Tower – Vilnius

(lithuaniantours.com)

Ninth Fort – Kaunas

(richardbloomproductions.com)

Trakai Castle – Trakai

(hqworld.net)

Lithuanian Sea Museum – Klaipeda

(balticsea.travel)

Lithuania was the first Baltic Republic to declare its independence from the USSR on March 11, 1990. The rebelliousness that fueled this has inspired many to speak out against collectivism and tyranny.

Our fellow Americans should look to people like my parents and others who’ve escaped here to better appreciate the freedoms afforded to them here in the United States.

Happy Independence Day, Lietuva!